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into command of the ross volunteers were stymied by the sheer size of the breakaway confederate states of america which covered a space larger than the entire european territory conquered by napoleon. lincoln's closest adviser was secretary of state william henry seward. seward said that even they fail to see the difficulty of the union's task cannot apprehending the vast extent of the rebellion as he put it. military operations to be successful must be on a scale hitherto practically unknown in the art of war. >> the second year of the civil war, the strange federal government and we can in forces. 1862 and abraham lincoln's rise to greatness at 830 eastern, part of four days of book tv this weekend and read through christmas day on c-span2. >> with just days left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-in list of notable books. book tv will feature several of these list focusing on nonfiction selections. these titles were included in the st. louis post-dispatch is best books of 2012. in the last great senate courage and statesmanship in times of crisis. a former se
] >> we have a question here. >> [inaudible] ross is reopening a revival with al pacino playing a different role. your great and striking plays are rather cynical about american capitalism, and no great problem this. interestingly, harold pinter, his great play -- you've had nothing to do with his political message, but as a great or artist who's written some great plays, do you see yourself evolving that in some way, that in some way the way to articulate your politics and culture is going to be incorporated in your art in some way? >> well, i don't think any of my plays are political, i certainly hope they aren't, and also i don't think harold's are. he wrote a couple of accelerately political plays later in life, but husband plays were just -- his plays were just yumny. i don't think it's the place of the theater to be political. i shouldn't even be here tonight, actually. [applause] um, was i critical of capital? i was driving a cab at the time i wrote most of those early plays. and i'm not driving a cab 234eu8 anymore. [laughter] so, you know, i see -- if you're writing the
scheme to register and jackson and then rehash of ross barnett at the the ballgame standing up to give a speech to resist the tyranny of the federal government to evoke nullification, and into position the. >> he folds like a cheap suit on the telephone. >> but he did not. that led the president to send in federal troops and the national guard. >> one of my favorite stories of president kennedy he was to say to equally bad segregationist mayor of jackson, mississippi, i don't care if you denounce me in public but don't you dare do it and private. [laughter] that is leadership. >> robert kennedy tells arnet i taped that conversation. >> exactly the. >> they were released in nearly 60 is. >> is an exhibit and it is a delight to watch people dissolve now that he can no longer do harm. the next eight may be a little arcane. this space program to show whether real president sounds like. this is president kennedy 1962, not a year and half after he made the announcement of the "state of the union" speech of the goal to get to the moon meeting with a reluctant leader of nasa, a james webb. lis
and about two and a half miles that way was jon ross's house, and that's american history right there in many ways. and there is no excusing it. there is some explaining it, but i think it is pretty much a story agreed and power and southerners and westerners became resentful of the new englanders and the northeast as the morrill part of this became more pronounced in the 1830's with jeremiah and others but the argument in the south and west is that is easy enough for them, they have already driven their indians this way to be as it was a brutal clash but one in which very little -- not much good can be said except for henry knox. >> we have time for two more questions. >> i have one more. >> you mentioned briefly jefferson's the five exchanges of hamilton which were defined as and correctly they were difficult. and nonetheless, hamilton played a major role in the development of the american economy. and i wonder if you could give some thought. what importance does he attached to it and what contribution he might have made. >> it's a wonderful question. basically because jeffers
have ross the town. -- lost the town. at that point corps ordered the second ranger battalion dog company to seize the high ground at hill 400, and the reason why hill 400 is important is because it basically, it was a window into hitler's greatest secret of the war at the time which was the battle of the bulge. nine days later on december 16, hitler would launch the battle of the bulge. the bulge assembly areas, there was a perfect view of them on top of hill 400. the germans knew that that high ground had to be held at all costs or seized. and the rangers wanted it also because it had very good artillery positions. and that morning on december 7th they were ordered to clear the rest of bergstein. as they moved out, they were in cellars that were filled with water that was waist deep, and they were told that they had to take hill 400. and it's an incredible story. as today moved through bergstein, they went through a cemetery that was, the graves were actually overturned because it had been shelled so many times bilal lied and we are man artillery. they were being hit by our arti
with glen ross whittaker came out a vietnam vet area, country joe and the fish. it really caught violence over here on haight streak come attack court came down. i can just see it right now they have this big shields. they beat the out of all the hippies in 1968. i was standing up there and i came down because they were just beating the out of this kid. i came down and they started whacking me with them a stake. i think the great thing about san francisco was the journalism. herb kane wrote in his column the next day about how smith got beat up and they don't even beat up the red cross and more time. so you had this liberal, journalistic for the state to change the establishment into backing out insert your comical that very well. >> well, thank you everyone for coming tonight. books are for sale at the front counter. trained to book a signing at the front. go ahead and continue the conversation at the signing table. thank you very much for coming in. chair mark [cheers and applause] >> tree into a and founder of salon. for more information, visit salon.com. >> now joining us on booktv is
you are referring to was a true story, my only nonfiction book which was about ross perot and his employees who were put in jail during the iranian revolution, an adventure story across the country and also those revolutionaries at first appeared to be on the side of freedom but when they got into power like so many revolutionaries throughout history they were more impressive than the people who preceded them so tragically, no surprise, i wish there had been. >> thank you. i was just curious as to whether in your research you had come court across any changes because so much youth over the past few years, electronic surveillance, the spy business or by governments which had really changed the political reality radically -- various subjects. >> i haven't done much about that kind of thing but the reason is during the years of the recent incredibly quick technological development i have been running about the middle ages and the -- i was able to kind of escape from having to deal with all of that sort of stuff but i am sure you are right. the kind of intelligence that comes from tec
bob minzesheimer looking forward to, the king years, ross perot, my life, al gore, the future, should also point out that a couple other books coming out, general stanley mcchrystal has a book coming out, my share of the tasks, dick cheney on coronary disease. his book is coming out in
into american politics to have bad brine and demeter in their names. [laughter] my people are people like ross perot. john mccain. they tend to lose. a was pleased to see bob dole back on the senate floor last week. but bob dole rhymes with a lot of things. but to have bad names for rhyming this sounds easy because it rhymes with tusche but when george w. bush left office i wanted to write a poem i had a lot of middle names. it was a do to you george herbert walker of and never treasured as a talker your predicates were prone to wander down to less off alone. [laughter] so on your greenwich country day relax in never ordered japanese. clinton is a bad name. and in his second term with the unpleasant nests remember when hillary clinton said to take a lead she would appear on the today program and clinton would not work so i was forced to use the native name. the name of origen. or the slave name. it was up to hillary rodham to prove that his house is not sodom. [laughter] but obama of the jokes of his name it was a good name to rhyme but unfortunately i use them with osama bin london clap your
've been able to see themselves. >> next, we take a tour of the uss slater with richard ross. mr. cross describes the role these boats played in winning the second second world war. >> "the shepherds of the sea," and it's a book, basically, about destroyer escorts in world war ii and the men who sailed them. and destroyer escorts actually ended up being the most important, um, successful and valuable antisubmarine vessel in the united states' fleet during world war ii. they're credited with sinking some 70 u-boats, 26 japanese submarines, and they fought in every major battle in the pacific theater. so they were a very senate force in world -- significant force in world war ii. and what's even more remarkable to me is the people who were manning those boats. these are mostly teenagers with little or no experience on the water with. in fact, some of them told me that the only thing they knew about boats is that the pointed end went first. so they were a remarkable group of teenagers. um, they were very courageous, and they were being led by their skippers, and their skippers were ivy lea
. for example my classmate gary ross kept himself in the closet and tell until "don't ask don't tell" was lifted just when he continued putting himself in harm's way and serving our country. we just heard about my classmate, matt freeman. i learned about matt's death on facebook which is obviously not the ideal ways to learn that one of your friends has been killed but it did allow me to go right to stage and see what people were saying about him at the time which was incredibly, incredibly cathartic. i remember looking at what he'd written before he was killed in the ops -- obviously put a post up that someone interpreted as disagreeing with president obama's policies and the start of one of these arguments you see on facebook all the time enselman says you said this and i think this and you go back and forth and you say please just shut up. matt was incredibly inspiring. he said don't fight on my page. i disagree with some political decisions but he is my commander in chief and i support him and all military systems. to my knowledge that was the last post my friend matt wrote on facebook. in
was john ross' house. and, you know, that's -- there's american history right there in many ways. and there's no excusing it. there's some explaining it. but i think it's pretty much a story of greed and power. and southerners and westerners became resentful of the new englanders and the northeast as the moral part of this became more pronounced in the 1830s with jeremiah e earths and others. but it was a brutal clash but one that, one which very little -- not much good can be said except for henry knox. >> i think we have time for two more questions. >> i have one more. >> you can have one and -- [inaudible] >> i think there's a lady behind me. >> perfect. >> okay. you mentioned briefly jefferson's exchanges with ham hamilton. >> yes, sir. >> which were, if i understand correctly, difficult. and nonetheless, hamilton played a major role in the development of the american economy. and i just wondered if you could give some thought to how jeffson envisaged the development of the american economy, what importance he attached to it and what contribution he might have made to it. >> it's a wond
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12